Is‌ ‌an‌ ‌Australian‌ ‌Shepherd‌ ‌Husky‌ ‌mix‌ ‌the‌ ‌right‌ ‌dog‌ ‌for‌ ‌you?‌

You know the Australian Shepherd. You know the Siberian Husky. But do you know the Australian Shepherd Husky mix?

Also named the Aussie Siberian, Aussie Husky, Aussie Husky Shepherd, and Australian Husky, this crossbreed is nothing short of entertaining.

Between their bold personalities and work ethic, you’ll never be bored with one of these pups.

Australian Shepherd Husky mix dog in golden autumn

Wondering if this designer dog is your canine soulmate? Keep reading to find out.

What is an Aussie Husky cross?

Not to be mistaken with the Ausky, an Australian Cattle Dog Husky mix, the Aussie Husky is a cross between the Australian Shepherd and Siberian Husky.

Like many mixed breeds, the history of this hybrid isn’t well-documented. It is said that they originated during the 1990s in North America, but they may have existed way before that time.

They’re also not recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC), but the International Designer Canine Registry (IDCR), International Canine Association (ICA), and Dog Registry of America (DRA) do recognize them.

Since designer dogs have purebred parents with established breed standards, known origins, and personalities, we’ll get an idea of how they’ll turn out.

Australian Shepherd’s put the “herd” in “shepherd”

Pure Australian Shepherd in a field
Meet the highly energetic Australian Shepherd dog

While they originally hail from Europe, Australian Shepherds rose to stardom in the Australian outback.

After being imported to the United States, ranchers and farmers took note of the Aussie’s unmatched herding ability. From then on, they’ve been icons of the American West.

Aussies are good-natured, but they prefer working over snuggling. When they aren’t rounding up sheep on the farm, they’re excelling at canine sports.

From agility to flyball to obedience, there’s nothing an Australian Shepherd can’t do.

Siberian Husky: the natural-born sled dog

Siberian Husky sled dogs
The natural-born sled Siberian Husky dogs

You’re probably familiar with Balto and Togo, two famous Siberian Huskies.

In 1925, these Huskies and their sledding teams traveled 674 miles to deliver crucial diphtheria medication to Nome, Alaska. Togo and his team covered 260 miles alone!

This exceptional show of this breed’s dedication and athleticism isn’t a one-off occurrence.

The Chukchi people from Asia’s northeastern-most point created the Siberian Husky. They served as companions, guardians, and as sled dogs.

Siberian Huskies are still renowned for their strength and endurance, but they’ve also gotten quite a hijinks reputation. Needless to say, you’ll never be bored with a Husky or Husky mix.

What does an Australian Shepherd Husky mix look like?

Australian Shepherd Husky mix sitting on bedNo two Aussie Siberians look alike, but they all have a striking appearance. Their stocky build is contrasted by their longer muzzle and fox-like features.

They have round, expressive eyes that can be brown or blue. Sometimes, they can have both – a phenomenon known as heterochromia.

Usually, Aussie Husky Shepherds have one solid coat color on their bellies, legs, and chest.

The rest of their bodies will be a different color or pattern. But other combinations of black, white, brown, cream, tan, gray, and merle are possible.

The Siberian Husky’s fur is much shorter than the Australian Shepherd’s, so their crossbreed offspring have varying coat lengths.

No matter if your Australian Husky’s fur is short or long, they’re all but guaranteed to have thick, weather-resistant double coats.

How big do Australian Shepherd Husky mixes get?

Aussie Siberians are considered medium to large dogs. While they tend to be muscular and solidly built, they aren’t huge.

Most full-grown Australian Huskies weigh 35 to 70 pounds (16 to 32 kg) and stand 20 to 25 inches at the shoulder. Take a look at this growth chart to see how your Aussie Husky puppy’s size will change:

Age (in months) Weight (pounds/kg)
3 months 17 to 26 pounds (8 to 12 kg)
6 months 30 to 48 pounds (14 to 22 kg)
9 months 33 to 52 pounds (15 to 24 kg)
12 months 35 to 70 pounds (16 to 32 kg)

Don’t be surprised if your Aussie Husky falls outside of this range. They could be bigger or smaller, depending on their genetics.

 If this hybrid has a Miniature Aussie parent, it will likely be relatively petite.

Size-wise, Australian Husky Shepherds can handle living in a small home or apartment. Their energy levels are too great for this arrangement to work out long-term, though.

A spacious home with a fenced yard is ideal for this crossbreed.

Do Australian Shepherd Husky mixes shed?

Aussie Husky Shepherds shed so much, and you’ll wonder how there’s any fur left on their bodies. Their shedding is at its heaviest when your pup blows her coat.

This usually occurs twice a year during spring or fall – when the weather warms up and cools down.

Just check out this video of an Australian Shepherd Husky mix girl named Niropi, proudly showing off her coat-blowing handiwork!

Temperament: are Australian Shepherd Husky mixes good dogs?

Aussie Siberians have interesting personalities, but they’ve been described as simultaneously independent and fiercely loyal.

Their devotion and natural sense of “stranger danger” make Aussie Huskies excellent watchdogs. They’ll protect both pack and home at all costs.

This also means that early socialization is crucial, particularly if you entertain frequently or have other pets at home.

Notice how this Australian Shepherd Husky mix puppy is wary at first, but quickly realizes he’s just made a new bestie!

Australian Shepherds are herders at heart, and Huskies can have a strong prey drive. Anticipate that these tendencies can present potential problems.

Neither your cat nor the family gerbil will appreciate being chased from room to room.

It isn’t just small animals that need to be on guard. Aussie Siberians are sometimes intimidated by larger canines. Keep this in mind if you intend to expand your pack in the future.

You might be thinking, will this hybrid get along with my children? The answer is a resounding MAYBE.

Australian Huskies rarely turn down an opportunity to play, but they value their personal space.

Make sure your kids understand when to give your pup a little breathing room, and closely monitor their interactions. This is the best way to prevent either party from getting hurt.

While they may not always show it, the Aussie Siberian doesn’t want to be away from its people.

They can become distressed or develop separation anxiety if left alone too long. So we won’t recommend this pooch for jetsetters with busy lifestyles.

We’d also have to caution the couch potatoes amongst us. Australian Husky Shepherds have zero chill.

This rambunctious crossbreed will turn to mischief-making when they’re bored–and they love to chew.

You can give your dog some toys to play on his own while staying indoors, such as chew toys, puzzles, and an interactive feeder. These will surely entertain him for a while.

Of course, combining exercise with regular training can keep Fido from changing into his alter ego, Destructo Dog. Combat their stubborn streak and restlessness with consistent training that includes breaks for playtime.

Don’t be intimidated, though. With a knowledgeable, confident owner, the Australian Shepherd Siberian Husky mix could become a service or therapy dog!

Owning an Australian Shepherd Husky mix

Your dog’s personality plays a huge part in determining their compatibility with your home. But their maintenance routine is just as important.

The Aussie Husky can be a bit demanding when it comes to grooming and exercise. Think you can handle it?

How to groom a Husky Australian Shepherd mix

Australian Shepherd Husky mix after bathing
Image source

Regular grooming encourages a strong bond with your pup, and hydrates their coat while keeping it tangle-free.

Use a slicker brush to work through your Aussie Husky’s fur at least 3 to 5 times a week.

You can also give Fido a haircut to reduce grooming time. And by “haircut,” we mean a light trim. If you cut this crossbreed’s fur too short or shave it off, you can severely damage their double coat.

Along those lines, only bathe your Aussie Siberian when they’re noticeably stinky. Shampooing them too often can dry out their lustrous coat.

Brush their teeth, wipe their eyes, and clean their ears daily. Not only will this keep your Australian Husky in tip-top condition, but it’ll also help you stay on top of their health.

If you notice an increase in discharge around the eyes or redness in the ears, your pup could be fighting an infection.

Last but not least, you’ll want to plan on monthly nail trims. Nothing says ouch like a 60-pound canine running with inch-long talons.

Diet & nutrition: what’s the best dog food for Australian Shepherd Huskies?

Australian Shepherd Husky mix eating their meal
Image source

Most Australian Huskies are voracious eaters. They require 1.5 to 4 cups of food a day, depending on their age, size, and energy level.

There are a ton of options when it comes to choosing a nutritious dog food. Whether your pup prefers liquidy chow or dry kibble, choose a high-protein diet.

While we’re on the topic of delicious noms, some Husky Aussie mixes have sensitive stomachs.

Some owners deal with this by giving their fur baby homemade meals or a raw diet.

But if you’re transitioning your pet from one brand or type of food to another, it has to be done gradually. If not, it can cause further upset tummies.

If you want to stick to dry dog food, you’ll find kibbles made specifically for puppies and adults with sensitive stomachs.

Exercising your Aussie Husky

Australian Shepherd Husky mix lying in snow
Image source

Coming from two working breeds with Energizer Bunny stamina, the Australian Shepherd Siberian Husky mix needs a minimum of 1.5 to 2 hours of daily exercise.

Purebred Huskies can run up to 100 miles a day, just to give you an idea of the Aussie Husky’s staying power. But just because they can doesn’t mean they should.

Divide your dog’s exercise into two or more vigorous workout sessions. This reduces the risks of joint pain, muscle soreness, dehydration, or heat exhaustion.

Given their mental acumen, your dog will love the outdoors. The smells and sights provide additional stimulation that makes their brains happy. That said, you’ll need to take a couple of precautions to keep them safe.

Your Aussie Husky mix will love off-leash play, but they must be in a secure area first. If they catch a scent or see potential prey, they’ll pull a disappearing act so fast, you won’t know what happened.

Additionally, this crossbreed is built for cold weather. With their thick fur, they can quickly overheat in hotter climates. Limiting their time outside and providing plenty of fresh water can help during summer.

Lifespan: Are Australian Siberians healthy?

Both the Australian Shepherd and Siberian Husky are relatively healthy, but they do carry a few illnesses that they can pass on to their hybrid offspring, such as:

While some of these conditions aren’t preventable, many are treatable, at the very least.

You can stave off heat stroke by letting your pup lounge in a room with an AC and cool water when it’s hot out. Regular bonding through play, exercise, and training can ease Fido’s anxiety.

Even allergies can be mitigated somewhat. Once you and your vet pinpoint the cause of your Aussie SIberian’s allergic reactions, you’ll be able to reduce your pup’s exposure to those allergens.

Work closely with your vet to stay ahead of any potential health problems that could arise.

With the right amount of prevention and maintenance, your Australian Husky Shepherd can enjoy a lifespan of 10 to 14 years!

How much is an Australian Shepherd Husky mix puppy?

Cute Australian Shepherd Husky mix puppy
Image source

Aussie Huskies tend to cost a bit less than other Australian Shepherd or Husky crossbreeds. On average, Aussie Siberian puppies are priced between $500 and $1,400.

This doesn’t include other medical and non-medical expenses, like training costs, supplies, and vaccines that can total up to $4000 spent during his first year.

To save a few coins, try to find a pup who already had their first round of vaccines. You can also ask breeders about the size of their current litter.

Most Aussie Siberian litters have 6 to 9 puppies. The larger the litter, the pups will likely be cheaper.

Now that you know how much you need to save, you can start thinking about if you’ll get your pup from a kennel or a rescue. Let’s take a look at both options.

Finding an Aussie Husky breeder & rescues

The Siberian Husky Australian Shepherd mix is still somewhat uncommon, so you might have difficulty finding a breeder. But when you do, make sure you get health guarantees for your puppy.

It’s also a good idea to visit in person. Scope the place out, ask every question you can think of, and spend time with the dogs.

This is the surest way to know that the breeder is trustworthy and that the pups have been well-cared for.

You may have better luck finding an Aussie Siberian for adoption, though. Granted, there could be other breeds tossed into the mix.

If that’s okay, call around local shelters near you or check their websites. Many will have pictures of their adoptable pups online.

You can also search for breed-specific rescues for Australian Shepherds and Siberian Huskies that also offer their mixes for adoption:

  1. Southern Siberian Rescue (Raleigh, NC)
  2. Husky House (Matawan, NJ)
  3. NorCal Aussie Rescue (Sacramento, CA)
  4. Lone Star Aussie Rescue (Cedar Hill, TX)
  5. A Forever Home Rescue Foundation (Chantilly, VA)

Here are even more Aussie and Husky mixes you’ll love

The Aussie Siberian is an impressive dog. Their boundless energy and vibrant personality won’t fit every home, though. If you’re feeling iffy about this hybrid, check out these alternatives:

Aussiedor (Australian Shepherd Lab mix)

Aussiedoodle (Australian Shepherd Poodle mix)

Gerberian Shepsky (Siberian Husky German Shepherd mix)

Pitsky (Siberian Husky Pitbull mix)

Are you ready for the Aussie Husky?

Australian Shepherd Husky mix hiking
Image source

As with all dogs, the Australian Shepherd Husky mix has its pros and cons.

Experienced, energetic owners will be in awe of this mixed breed’s endurance. Desk-bound owners (or couch-bound–we don’t judge) may disagree.

If you can give your Aussie Husky the right balance of structure and sport, you two will get along splendidly.

What are your thoughts on the Australian Shepherd Husky mix? Let us know in the comments!

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