Is the Border Collie Australian Shepherd mix one of the perfect dogs?

The Border Collie Australian Shepherd mix, also known as Border Aussie or Aussie Collie, is an incredibly intelligent, affectionate, and high energy crossbreed. But is it the right dog for you?

Border Collie Australian Shepherd mix portrait

Since they’re a combination of two purebreds, you never know what physical traits and temperament your hybrid pet will end up with. That’s why this article will help you sort out what you can expect from this fido.

Tell me about the Border Collie Australian Shepherd parents!

This impressive designer dog has two pretty incredible parents, and you guessed it right – the Border Collie and the Australian Shepherd.

Both are popular breeds in the United States for a good reason. Here’s what you should know. 

The beautiful Border Collie 

Beautiful Border Collie
Meet the gorgeous Border Collie

Border Collies, simply called as Borders, are also known as Scotch Sheepdogs.

They were developed in Scotland, but they have a long history that dates back to the Viking and Roman invaders in Britain, who brought along their dogs.

Over time, they were crossed with sheepdogs and spitz-types to create one of the best herding dogs known today. But most Borders can be traced back to Old Hemp, who’s widely known as the “father” of the breed.

He was born in 1893 to two sheepdog parents, and right away showed an incredible aptitude for herding.

In 1995, they were officially recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC).

What makes them particularly beloved is the fact that they are incredibly intelligent. They regularly rank as one of the smartest breeds out there, along with Poodles and German Shepherds.

These medium-sized dogs stand about 18 to 22 inches (45 to 56 cm) tall at the shoulder and weigh between 30 to 45 pounds (14 to 20 kg).

Borders are mostly recognized by their black and white coat color, but they also come in merle and tri-color coats.

They can come in other shades, including black, blue, merle, brindle, lilac, red, sable, and any combination.

They have a medium-length double coat, which means they do shed. They also come in both rough and smooth coat varieties.

The Athletic Australian Shepherd

Four Australian Shepherd dogs running
The four Australian Shepherd dogs in different colors

Often referred to as Aussies, Australian Shepherds didn’t originate in Australia. They actually came from Spain and France, near the Pyrenees Mountains.

Immigrants to Australia brought the dog along to help with cattle ranching.

From there, they set sail for California, where they became established as part of cowboy culture and were saddled with the name “Australian Shepherd,” when the people there assumed that’s where they originated from. By 1993, they were recognized by the AKC.

This purebred has a height of 18 to 23 inches (46 to 58 cm) and weighs 40 to 65 pounds (18 to 29 kg).

Their medium-length coat can either be straight or wavy, and can come in different colors such as black, red, merle, or a mix of those with white, bicolor, or tricolor.

As with any double coated canine, this pooch is a shedder, too.

Aussies are exceptional herding dogs, and they have a high work ethic and drive.

They’re also incredibly smart, which helps them work independently and anticipate their partner’s needs while herding massive animals like cattle.

Breed Recognition: Which clubs recognize the Border Aussie mix?

Despite having parents that are AKC-recognized, we can’t say the same for the Border Collie Australian Shepherd mix because they’re a crossbreed.

However, they are recognized by these other clubs. Those include the Designer Dogs Kennel Club (DDKC), International Designer Canine Registry (IDCR), American Canine Hybrid Club (ACHC), and the Dog Registry of America, Inc.(DRA).

What does a Border Collie Australian Shepherd mix look like?

Border Collie Australian Shepherd mix lying on the ground
Image source

You can expect a Border Aussie to have an athletic and well-balanced body. It has a mesocephalic head with floppy ears and almond-shaped eyes that can be brown or blue.

They may even have one eye different from the other, called heterochromia, which is common to both parent breeds.

How big will an Australian Shepherd Border Collie mix get?

A Border Collie-Australian Shepherd mix puppy is considered full-grown when they reach 12 to 15 months of age.

Depending on its parents’ size, they have an average height of 18 to 23 inches (46 to 58 cm) and can weigh 30 to 65 pounds (14 to 29.5 kg). As with any dog breed, males are generally larger than females.

If we’re going to base it on the average size of Australian Shepherds and Border Collies, you can use this growth chart as a guide for possible weight estimates for growing Border Aussies.

Age Weight of female Weight of male
8 weeks 5 to 9 pounds
(2 to 4 kg)
5 to 9 pounds
(2 to 4 kg)
3 months 11 to 20 pounds
(5 to 9 kg)
12 to 23 pounds
(5 to 10 kg)
6 months 21 to 39 pounds
(10 to 18 kg)
26 to 49 pounds
(12 to 22 kg)
9 months 25 to 50 pounds
(11 to 23 kg)
29 to 65 pounds
(13 to 29.5 kg)
12 months 28 to 43 pounds
(13 to 20 kg)
30 to 67 pounds
(14 to 30 kg)

As a medium- to large-sized dog, and considering the background of its parents with always running around, this hybrid requires a home with a large backyard.

If it’s a ranch or farm with open space and work to do, much better! They’re definitely not for apartment life.

Coat & Color: Do Aussie Border Collie mixes shed?

Yes, they do. And they blow their coat twice a year during the shedding season – spring and fall.

Though their appearance is unpredictable, their medium- to long-length double coat is something you can rely on for certainty. Most Aussie Collies have feathering on their chest, belly, legs, and tail.

Not only is their fur weatherproof, but it also comes in many colors like black and white, gray, brown, red, blue merle, red merle, and red tricolor.

Tan or white markings are possible, as well as tickled and brindle points.

It’s no surprise since the Border Collie has 17 official colors, and the Australian have 4.

Temperament: Are Border Aussies good family dogs?

Definitely! Border Collie Australian Shepherd mixes are people-oriented canines. They have a calm yet playful nature, and many will agree that they’re excellent family pets.

That doesn’t mean they’re suitable for every household. We recommend them for active families with older kids. They may be gentle, but like with any breed, Aussie Collies have their quirks.

This crossbreed has inherited the chasing and herding traits of its parents, which they’ll do with children. Some even do it to tools, just like Faun, a Border Collie Aussie mix nipping at a drill in this video:

It’s not a sign of aggression, but it’s what they’re parents are bred to do, and it highlights this breed’s strong herding instinct.

Still, teach your pup to behave around small pets like cats, rabbits, hamsters, chickens, and ducks.

While they won’t usually try to eat them, they will try to herd them around. That can cause stress for animals who aren’t used to being herded!

Australian Shepherd Border Collie mixes aren’t territorial, but if your pooch is a solitary working canine, be cautious as they can be more reluctant to interact with unknown dogs.

That’s why socialization is vital, and so are gradual introductions.

Early training from an experienced handler can make a difference in how this doggo will turn out, no matter where they are and who they meet.

Being in your company helps this hybrid thrive, but it also means they can get attached to one person and be quite stand-offish to others.

Believe it or not, it’s intentional behavior that breeders wanted for this fido – to be dedicated to their partner so they could work more effectively together.

With that said, Border Aussies can suffer from separation anxiety if left alone for too long. If you have to go out and you can’t bring your pup with you, a toy or a puzzle can entertain him for a while.

It can also divert his attention from acting out or being destructive, such as chewing.

You might be thinking, how can a highly energetic dog be calm? Well, It means that while they can work steadily all day at a task, they don’t get overly excited or out of control.

In other words, their mind is focused on while their body is hard at work.

Oh, and we mentioned that they’re smart, right? Check out this video of a clever Border Aussie named Roxy doing all kinds of impressive tricks.

Another great thing about this mixed breed is that they’re not barkers unless they’re herding. But around the house? They aren’t likely to alert you every time a leaf falls or a neighbor laughs.

One more trait you have to remember about Aussie Collies is that they’re sensitive to their owner’s moods.

Whether it’s during training or just to have a harmonious relationship with your pet, set boundaries. Teach him right from wrong, and what is allowed and what isn’t.

If you don’t, he’ll feel like they can set the rules, and you may not like the results!

Are Border Aussies difficult to care for?

Border Collie Australian Shepherd mixes require a lot of attention in terms of being active and grooming. Do you think you’re up for it?

Exercise and play are important

The playful Border Collie Australian Shepherd mix
Image source

If there’s one thing you can’t skimp on, it’s exercise and playtime. Remember, these are half Border Collie and half Australian Shepherd, so they’re basically working dogs who are used to being busy.

On top of that, they might work all day long without any breaks.

And we’re not just talking about physical stimulation, but also mental stimulation.

They need 90 minutes to 2 hours of exercise every single day. Regardless of the weather condition, they have to be on the move.

Agility is an excellent choice. It challenges both their mind and their body – and it’s fun for you, too. Another option is doing what they’re bred for. You can find clubs that will let you participate in herding trials.

There’s also flyball, swimming, hiking, and fetch. Or strap on a pair of rollerblades and take your Aussie Collie with you around the neighborhood.

As long as they’re getting plenty of romping and mental stimulation, they’ll be happy to curl up with you on the sofa for the rest of the time.

How to groom a Border Collie Australian Shepherd mix?

In terms of grooming, they’re moderate to high maintenance designer dog.

With their type of coat that tends to tangle, brushing at least twice a week can keep them looking dapper. During shedding season, do it daily.

Use a pin and slicker brush combo, which is the perfect tool for preventing mats and distributing the coat’s natural oils while targeting loose fur in the undercoat.

As a fairly clean breed, they won’t need regular baths. Using a mild shampoo, you can wash your pet once every six weeks or when they smell or look filthy.

For other weekly grooming routines, nails should be clipped every other week. You can use a nail grinder if your Border Collie-Australian cross is okay with it.

And don’t forget ear cleaning and checking to ensure that he won’t get an infection.

Finally, brush his teeth every other day, or give him dental chews every few days and brush once a week. You want to keep those pearly whites looking and smelling clean.

Feedin’ time!

Border Collie Australian Shepherd mix waiting for food
Image source

Most Border Collie Australian Shepherd mixes love to eat, and they aren’t picky. Feed them a high quality, protein-based diet to give them plenty of nutrients to foster their active lifestyle.

How much you feed your pet depends on his activity level, weight, age, and health.

For Aussie Collies, they generally need 1.5 to 3 cups of dry kibbles daily split into two meals. That’s around 1,100 calories. If your fur buddy is a working dog, he’ll need about 1,400 calories a day.

Health: How long do Border Collie Australian Shepherd mixes live?

Border Collie Australian Shepherd mixes have a lifespan of 10 to 17 years. Many crossbreeds are healthier than their purebreds, but they can still be predisposed to some genetic illnesses.

If you want your pooch to have a long, healthy life, watch out for health issues that they can get from their Border and Aussie parents.

Active breeds are mostly prone to hip and elbow dysplasia, but this fido is also susceptible to eye problems like Collie Eye Anomaly (CEA), Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA), and cataracts. Deafness and blindness is a possibility due to a double merle gene.

Other health concerns you have to be aware of are hemangiosarcoma and lymphoma, and epilepsy.

Aside from knowing what diseases your Border Collie & Australian Shepherd cross can inherit from Borders and Aussies, proper health tests are necessary. Not only of the parents but also the pup.

Where can I find Border Collie Australian Shepherd mixes for sale?

Border Collie Australian Shepherd mix puppy
Image source

Sold on a Border Collie Australian Shepherd mix? Bad news: breeders aren’t easy to come by. There aren’t too many people out there intentionally breeding them.

That said, litters are generally large – around 4 to 9 puppies. So, if someone does breed them, there are plenty of pups to choose from.

If you want to get your hands on one, expect to pay a price of $600 to $800 for a puppy. Some can cost as much as $1,100.

Border Aussie breeders

Although there aren’t many breeders out there, Milky Way Border Aussies in Garland, Maine are breeding dogs, as is Kittelson Kennel in Oregon. You might also want to check out Hill Top Farm in Crete, Illinois.

Before buying a puppy from any breeder, you absolutely must do your research. Watch out for sellers who won’t let you visit the kennel where the dogs are raised or meet one or both parents.

Be wary of those who also sell multiple litters or breeds. That counts as a red flag, as are PayPal buttons or individuals who don’t put YOU through a screening.

Reputable breeders are transparent about their operations. They would even offer potential buyers to meet the puppies and parents, as well as find out about their lineage and medical records.

Border Collie Australian Shepherd mix for adoption

Rescuing or adopting is a course that we recommend you to take.

If you’ve already checked with your local shelter and there’s no available Australian Border Collie cross available to adopt, then browse rescue organizations for Border Collies and Australian Shepherds who also cater to their mixes.

Love Border Collies and Australian Shepherds? Here are some other mixes to consider

Not feeling sure if the Border Collie Australian Shepherd mix is right for you. Is one of these crossbreeds a better option for your lifestyle?

Australian Shepherd Lab mix (AKA Aussiedor)

Australian Shepherd Blue Heeler mix (AKA Texas Heeler)

Australian Shepherd Corgi mix (AKA Auggie)

Border Collie German Shepherd mix (AKA Shollie)

Golden Retriever Border Collie mix (AKA Coltriever)

Border Collie Lab mix (AKA Boradors)

Is the Border Collie Australian Shepherd mix the best choice for you?

Border Collie Australian Shepherd mix dog
Image source

What usually helps in answering that question is weighing in the pros and cons of a Border Aussie.

They’re intelligent, loyal, obedient, and friendly dogs. What else can you ask for in a furry friend, right?

But they also aren’t suitable for households with little children and small pets because of their herding instincts.

They require an experienced and active owner who can establish that they’re the pack leader, and they also require some time and energy when it comes to grooming and exercise.

If you feel more encouraged and excited, then you finally found the perfect canine buddy!

We absolutely adore the Border Collie Australian Shepherd mix, but we want to hear your side. Share your thoughts with us by commenting below.

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.